APT13 Presenation: link to paper abstract

This is a link to the abstract of our presention at  APT13 Conference hosted by The University of Greenwich:

https://showtime.gre.ac.uk/index.php/ecentre/apt2013/paper/viewPaper/298

 

 

Videos vs. interactive videos

Here is an abstract of an article, which I found very interesting.

“Four different settings were studied: three were e-learning environments—with interactive video, with non-interactive video, and without video. The fourth was the traditional classroom environment. Results of the experiment showed that the value of video for learning effectiveness was contingent upon the provision of interactivity. Students in the e-learning environment that provided interactive video achieved significantly better learning performance and a higher level of learner satisfaction than those in other settings. However, students who used the e-learning environment that provided non-interactive video did not improve either. “

Zang et al., (2006) Instructional video in e-learning: Assessing the impact of  interactive video on learning effectiveness, Information & Management, vol. 43;  pages 15–27

My view is that videos which are not interactive can be effective learning tools too .  It is more about how they are integrated in the learning and teaching practices that makes the difference.  Still, testing students’ reponces is the way forward.

 

 

Students confirming the purposes of instructional videos

Fashion students were asked to view some of the specialist processes and machine induction videos produced in LCF. Many said that they liked the possibility to view the instructions at the time when most needed; as such, the video could be used  as notes are used to revise.  Students in their final year saw the videos as a resource which could help to develop the technical files that they were asked to compile in year 1. They preferred very short and close shots on the processes.  Longer videos of complex processes were seen as inspirational e.g.  the influence of Seville Raw tailoring on fashion sportswear.

Where MIT leads others follow

Today I found online instructions from MIT on how to create on-line video tutorials.  It made me think: “Is our project reinventing the wheel?” Sometimes we need to reinvent the wheel, as it takes us along our own road of learning. The feedback from students viewing our own videos is invaluable; it shows a richness of responses to the videos, and we should listen to our own students.   More from the surveys is to come soon.

Guidelines for multimedia resources creation

Here is another helpful summary, relevant to those making and using on-line instructional  videos or lectures.  There are several underlining principles of using multimedia resources, based on theories of how the human brain processes a combination of verbal and visual information: 1)It is better to provide explanations in two forms of information rather than one  e.g. a film with corresponding  verbal explanation is better than just a visual aid; 2) Multimedia explanations should include words in verbal rather than written form e.g. try watching a subtitled film; 3) Coherent summary  highlighting key words/visuals  is better than detailed explanations.

All common sense really, but neatly put together.

Mayer, R. And Moreno, R.  A Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning – pls contact me for a full reference.

Useful information on e-learning effectiveness

Here  is   the summary  of  a study comparing student satisfaction and formal test results after using four different types of instruction:  traditional classroom, on-line instruction without video, on-line instruction with video, and on-line instruction with interactive video  (video organised in small chunks that are well-indexed, and easily manipulated).  All groups that used on-line instruction reported higher satisfaction than the group with traditional classroom instruction.  The students using on-line instruction without video and those using on-line instruction with linear video scored equal satisfaction.   The interactive video group reported higher satisfaction.  The test scores (learning outcome) of the group using the interactive video were higher than those of  the other three groups.

Does this justify the time investment that making interactive videos require?    

(Zang et al, (2006), ‘Instructional video in e-learning: Assessing the impact of interactive video on learning effectiveness’, Information & Management   vol.  43: 15–27, [Available on-line: www.sciencedirect.com]

 

Teaching & Learning Fellowship update

 

As a part of our fellowship project we carried out focus group surveys with 24 LCF students (Curtain Rd based, D&T courses) . 66% (16 students) had not seen the LCF video resources under the Blackboard Fashion Portal tab but 83% (20 students ) had accessed websites and watched on-line videos broadly related to their subject. The most commonly mentioned sites were TED.com, Style.com, Vimeo (broadly), Youtube (broadly). 85% answers stated “own on-line search” or “friend’s advice” as the way of finding those sites/videos, 74% answers stated home as the location from which the videos were accessed. The data suggests that whilst the students are open to using on-line resources, they are more likely to follow friends’ recommendations than those of academic or technical staff . These are preliminary findings, and we hope to extend our research into next autumn term 2012 so we can gather more data from LCF students.

 
 

This video was shot for our new Technical Portal at LCF

RB67
This video was shot by James Montgomery (technician) part of the Media School of Fashion at LCF to explain using a stills camera they have for students to use. Imagine what voice over or captions would be most appropriate?

Many more videos like this will be made to help students in their learning of using equipment. The idea is to use QR codes by or on the kit so they can have instant access to either a short video or at least some written resource as to how to use the equipment properly.