Videos vs. interactive videos

Here is an abstract of an article, which I found very interesting.

“Four different settings were studied: three were e-learning environments—with interactive video, with non-interactive video, and without video. The fourth was the traditional classroom environment. Results of the experiment showed that the value of video for learning effectiveness was contingent upon the provision of interactivity. Students in the e-learning environment that provided interactive video achieved significantly better learning performance and a higher level of learner satisfaction than those in other settings. However, students who used the e-learning environment that provided non-interactive video did not improve either. “

Zang et al., (2006) Instructional video in e-learning: Assessing the impact of  interactive video on learning effectiveness, Information & Management, vol. 43;  pages 15–27

My view is that videos which are not interactive can be effective learning tools too .  It is more about how they are integrated in the learning and teaching practices that makes the difference.  Still, testing students’ reponces is the way forward.

 

 

Lecture Capture workshops at the Media & Learning Conference

Stuart Phillipson, the Media Technologies Coordinator, Manchester University- UK will be delivering a seminar on Opencast Matterhorn: Finding workable open source solutions at the REC:all pre conference event for the Media & Learning Conference in Brussels (14th-16th Nov 2012).

I met Stuart at the Opencast Matterhorn Un-Conference at Oxford University Computer Services (OUCS) in Jan 2012, where he made a brilliant presentation on statistics on students who had access to lecture capture recordings at Manchester Uni. He is adopting Opencast Matterhorn on a wide scale at Manchester Uni. I couldn’t make this conference but you can view his presentation here from the http://www.rec-all.info/  site where they post many events and webinars. REC:all are affiliated to ViTAL (Video in Teaching and Learning SIG).

Students confirming the purposes of instructional videos

Fashion students were asked to view some of the specialist processes and machine induction videos produced in LCF. Many said that they liked the possibility to view the instructions at the time when most needed; as such, the video could be used  as notes are used to revise.  Students in their final year saw the videos as a resource which could help to develop the technical files that they were asked to compile in year 1. They preferred very short and close shots on the processes.  Longer videos of complex processes were seen as inspirational e.g.  the influence of Seville Raw tailoring on fashion sportswear.

Where MIT leads others follow

Today I found online instructions from MIT on how to create on-line video tutorials.  It made me think: “Is our project reinventing the wheel?” Sometimes we need to reinvent the wheel, as it takes us along our own road of learning. The feedback from students viewing our own videos is invaluable; it shows a richness of responses to the videos, and we should listen to our own students.   More from the surveys is to come soon.

Students lead the way

Today I gave a presentation to the BSc Cosmetic Science students. At least 5 students had IPads or similar devices and were using them to flick through the presentation, in order to complete the group exercise.   Hence most students were already engaged in mobile learning experience.  The video creators who we have interviewed so far planned the videos as a “reminder / view in your own time” resource.    Some video resources can be planned and used to create an interactive workshop /lecture experience instead of a self-help guide.

Expecting all students to bring their own mobile devices to workshops and lectures might be seen as unfair on some, but ignoring the fact that many of them do it anyway is refusing to confront the reality.

Rhona Sharp from Oxford Brookes discusses issues of lecturing

An introduction to why we lecture, what some of the problems with lecturing are, and how we can improve lectures.

Summary of this video: Content conundrum: why do we lecture now? We want students to acquire knowledge, but then use that knowledge through application, analysis, synthesis, evaluation (without boring them!) Are lectures really the answer?

There are all sorts of problems linked to note taking in lectures according to Donald Bligh author of “What’s the use of Lectures?”….a good set of notes is very important to students attending lectures. Ability to summarize, paraphrase and integrate information through audio and on screen text is very hard. Lectures are no better at conveying knowledge than other methods such as: reading, handouts, videos, self study, problem based learning, or out of class activities

I think this links to something Eric Mazur said, a keynote speaker at ALT C in Manchester 2012, who found that brain activity during lectures was lower than while sleeping and comparable to while watching tv.

Guidelines for multimedia resources creation

Here is another helpful summary, relevant to those making and using on-line instructional  videos or lectures.  There are several underlining principles of using multimedia resources, based on theories of how the human brain processes a combination of verbal and visual information: 1)It is better to provide explanations in two forms of information rather than one  e.g. a film with corresponding  verbal explanation is better than just a visual aid; 2) Multimedia explanations should include words in verbal rather than written form e.g. try watching a subtitled film; 3) Coherent summary  highlighting key words/visuals  is better than detailed explanations.

All common sense really, but neatly put together.

Mayer, R. And Moreno, R.  A Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning – pls contact me for a full reference.

Useful information on e-learning effectiveness

Here  is   the summary  of  a study comparing student satisfaction and formal test results after using four different types of instruction:  traditional classroom, on-line instruction without video, on-line instruction with video, and on-line instruction with interactive video  (video organised in small chunks that are well-indexed, and easily manipulated).  All groups that used on-line instruction reported higher satisfaction than the group with traditional classroom instruction.  The students using on-line instruction without video and those using on-line instruction with linear video scored equal satisfaction.   The interactive video group reported higher satisfaction.  The test scores (learning outcome) of the group using the interactive video were higher than those of  the other three groups.

Does this justify the time investment that making interactive videos require?    

(Zang et al, (2006), ‘Instructional video in e-learning: Assessing the impact of interactive video on learning effectiveness’, Information & Management   vol.  43: 15–27, [Available on-line: www.sciencedirect.com]

 

Lecture Capture using Galicaster + Opencast Matterhorn at LCF

So here is the user interface (UI) of the Galicaster workstation. Its very simple and easy to use. These are brave steps for LCF towards finding an automated solution for recording lectures. My colleagues Kirk Rutter, Phil Petrides and Deesh Sivanandan were invaluable again. The true test is the next 3 days for the DEL conference: http://myblog.arts.ac.uk/del2012/ where we will use this system to record the keynote lectures, then the recordings will be uploaded to this blog in the near future, its not fully automated just yet !