APT13 Presenation: link to paper abstract

This is a link to the abstract of our presention at  APT13 Conference hosted by The University of Greenwich:

https://showtime.gre.ac.uk/index.php/ecentre/apt2013/paper/viewPaper/298

 

 

DIAL

As the final report of this project emerges, here is a short reflection on the context within which it was developed, as well as where it might lead us. 

The Teaching and Professional Fellowship “Learning videos- do they work for you” benefitted from its close association with the DIAL project.  The project proposal’s aim and objectives were developed with the personal support from the DIAL and ALTO project managers, and with the help of video resources and papers on OER made available via Processarts, and the DIAL blog.    A key project objective was to contribute to enhancing learning and teaching practices by creating guidelines for producing and embedding learning videos in practical workshops. This objective is closely aligned with the DIAL objective to explore issues around digitally enhanced practices.   The range of information provided by the DIAL and associated blogs informed our project’s activities  (i.e. postings on: http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/cltad-teaching-development-projects; http://dial.myblog.arts.ac.uk/2012/05/25/should-ual-evaluate-digital-skill-levels-of-staff-and-students/)

DIAL also provided a link with previous and concurrent fellowship winners, Laura Norton and Lesley Raven, whose commentary and shared experience was helpful to our projects progress planning.     DIAL offered a platform for sharing our preliminary findings and advised on other dissemination events i.e. conferences; this is in line with our objective to share good practice: http://process.arts.ac.uk/category/project-groups/making-online-learning-videos.

 A draft paper will be presented at APT2013. Next Generation Learning Places and Work Spaces Conference. The University of Greenwich, July 2nd 2013. #aptnextgen
https://showtime.gre.ac.uk/index.php/ecentre/apt2013/index, an event sponsored by the Higher Education Academy and JISC : http://www2.gre.ac.uk/research/centres/ecentre

Teaching and Professional Fellowship project: summary report

Learning videos – do they work for you
Student focus group1
Project aim: To explore the value of the integration of on-line learning videos into the students learning experience in practical workshops (pattern cutting and sewing)
The videos which were subject of this investigation could be classified broadly as instructional videos, presenting processes or specialist machine introductions. As such, they can be referred to as a type of multimedia learning resources (using words and visual images) and learning objects: “any digital resource that can be reused to support learning” (Wiley, 2000)

Constructivism as an educational philosophy views learners’ engagement in the learning process as a key to constructing meaningful knowledge and skills. From this stand point, some researchers and educators have questioned the value of learning videos for the learners’ experience.
“It is believed that learning objects do not cause learning but provide its availability” (Yahya and Yusoff, 2008).

Project data: staff perspective
In summary, videos were created for one or more of the following reasons:
– To provide visualisation to student groups, and thus to overcome difficulties with understanding text or verbal instructions;
– To provide visualisation of areas that are difficult to see in a normal workshop situation, or of 3D process and movement which are of particular relevance;
– To provide availability of instruction on demand by the learner;
– To provide additional stimulation, inspiration and motivation.
The videos were commonly not seen as:
– A learning tool to be used by the instructors in workshops;
– As substitutes of direct instruction.

Project data: students’ perspective
The students are most likely to view the videos at home (75%), and currently the most commonly used viewing device is laptop (64%) .
The students stated the following reasons for using instructional videos: as a reminder, to visualise a process, to save time (instead of waiting to be seen and instructed again by a technician), to view something that they have missed in class.

The students preferred short (2-4 minutes) and clear process instructional videos. Longer videos of highly specialist processes were also seen as useful. General area and machine induction videos were rated as less useful. “Voice over” with camera focused on work demonstration was favoured over “talking head” style videos.

Students expected high quality image and sound. Some international students suggested subtitles.

Summary
Although staff created videos for a range of valid reasons -helping visualisation, enabling the less advanced learners- the video’s integration in the construction of knowledge was left to the students’ individual initiative.

Recommendations
Videos can be useful and helpful learning objects, which can enrich the students’ learning experience. To improve the effectiveness and reuse of videos, the following considerations can be included in the video planning and production stages:
– Identify the shortest visual and audio information that is to be related via the video;
– Identify key messages and terms as meta data that can used to enhance reusability;
– Adapt learning and teaching technique so that they incorporate learning objects in a more actively supportive role, instead of offering them as an “on-demand” resource.

Full references can be obtained from G.Daniels, e-mail address: g.n.daniels@fashion.arts.ac.uk

Videos vs. interactive videos

Here is an abstract of an article, which I found very interesting.

“Four different settings were studied: three were e-learning environments—with interactive video, with non-interactive video, and without video. The fourth was the traditional classroom environment. Results of the experiment showed that the value of video for learning effectiveness was contingent upon the provision of interactivity. Students in the e-learning environment that provided interactive video achieved significantly better learning performance and a higher level of learner satisfaction than those in other settings. However, students who used the e-learning environment that provided non-interactive video did not improve either. “

Zang et al., (2006) Instructional video in e-learning: Assessing the impact of  interactive video on learning effectiveness, Information & Management, vol. 43;  pages 15–27

My view is that videos which are not interactive can be effective learning tools too .  It is more about how they are integrated in the learning and teaching practices that makes the difference.  Still, testing students’ reponces is the way forward.

 

 

Where MIT leads others follow

Today I found online instructions from MIT on how to create on-line video tutorials.  It made me think: “Is our project reinventing the wheel?” Sometimes we need to reinvent the wheel, as it takes us along our own road of learning. The feedback from students viewing our own videos is invaluable; it shows a richness of responses to the videos, and we should listen to our own students.   More from the surveys is to come soon.

Students lead the way

Today I gave a presentation to the BSc Cosmetic Science students. At least 5 students had IPads or similar devices and were using them to flick through the presentation, in order to complete the group exercise.   Hence most students were already engaged in mobile learning experience.  The video creators who we have interviewed so far planned the videos as a “reminder / view in your own time” resource.    Some video resources can be planned and used to create an interactive workshop /lecture experience instead of a self-help guide.

Expecting all students to bring their own mobile devices to workshops and lectures might be seen as unfair on some, but ignoring the fact that many of them do it anyway is refusing to confront the reality.

Guidelines for multimedia resources creation

Here is another helpful summary, relevant to those making and using on-line instructional  videos or lectures.  There are several underlining principles of using multimedia resources, based on theories of how the human brain processes a combination of verbal and visual information: 1)It is better to provide explanations in two forms of information rather than one  e.g. a film with corresponding  verbal explanation is better than just a visual aid; 2) Multimedia explanations should include words in verbal rather than written form e.g. try watching a subtitled film; 3) Coherent summary  highlighting key words/visuals  is better than detailed explanations.

All common sense really, but neatly put together.

Mayer, R. And Moreno, R.  A Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning – pls contact me for a full reference.

Useful information on e-learning effectiveness

Here  is   the summary  of  a study comparing student satisfaction and formal test results after using four different types of instruction:  traditional classroom, on-line instruction without video, on-line instruction with video, and on-line instruction with interactive video  (video organised in small chunks that are well-indexed, and easily manipulated).  All groups that used on-line instruction reported higher satisfaction than the group with traditional classroom instruction.  The students using on-line instruction without video and those using on-line instruction with linear video scored equal satisfaction.   The interactive video group reported higher satisfaction.  The test scores (learning outcome) of the group using the interactive video were higher than those of  the other three groups.

Does this justify the time investment that making interactive videos require?    

(Zang et al, (2006), ‘Instructional video in e-learning: Assessing the impact of interactive video on learning effectiveness’, Information & Management   vol.  43: 15–27, [Available on-line: www.sciencedirect.com]

 

How to create good on-line videos – teaching and professional fellowship project findings

Staff views.  LCF technical staff focus group reviewed a number of videos (available from the LCF BlackBoard, PROCESSARTS, and an on-line video produced by Derby University) looking at their reuse values.  All videos were focused on basic sewing machine preparation and use, but differed in production style.  Several initial recommendations emerged:

– introduce a graphic overlay highlighting key points on the screen where  applicable;

– prepare good scripts, including some contextual information;

– consider  voiceover (to prevent the viewer from being distracted by the presenter) .