Guidelines for multimedia resources creation

Here is another helpful summary, relevant to those making and using on-line instructional  videos or lectures.  There are several underlining principles of using multimedia resources, based on theories of how the human brain processes a combination of verbal and visual information: 1)It is better to provide explanations in two forms of information rather than one  e.g. a film with corresponding  verbal explanation is better than just a visual aid; 2) Multimedia explanations should include words in verbal rather than written form e.g. try watching a subtitled film; 3) Coherent summary  highlighting key words/visuals  is better than detailed explanations.

All common sense really, but neatly put together.

Mayer, R. And Moreno, R.  A Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning – pls contact me for a full reference.

Useful information on e-learning effectiveness

Here  is   the summary  of  a study comparing student satisfaction and formal test results after using four different types of instruction:  traditional classroom, on-line instruction without video, on-line instruction with video, and on-line instruction with interactive video  (video organised in small chunks that are well-indexed, and easily manipulated).  All groups that used on-line instruction reported higher satisfaction than the group with traditional classroom instruction.  The students using on-line instruction without video and those using on-line instruction with linear video scored equal satisfaction.   The interactive video group reported higher satisfaction.  The test scores (learning outcome) of the group using the interactive video were higher than those of  the other three groups.

Does this justify the time investment that making interactive videos require?    

(Zang et al, (2006), ‘Instructional video in e-learning: Assessing the impact of interactive video on learning effectiveness’, Information & Management   vol.  43: 15–27, [Available on-line: www.sciencedirect.com]

 

Lecture Capture using Galicaster + Opencast Matterhorn at LCF

So here is the user interface (UI) of the Galicaster workstation. Its very simple and easy to use. These are brave steps for LCF towards finding an automated solution for recording lectures. My colleagues Kirk Rutter, Phil Petrides and Deesh Sivanandan were invaluable again. The true test is the next 3 days for the DEL conference: http://myblog.arts.ac.uk/del2012/ where we will use this system to record the keynote lectures, then the recordings will be uploaded to this blog in the near future, its not fully automated just yet !